Scooters vs. Bikes vs. Ad Creep

In Spacing‘s current issue, we have a small feature by contributor Liam Lahey on when does a bike truly become a bike (nudge, nudge: go pick up an issue). There has been much debate in the cycling community about e-bikes and scooters in Toronto bike lanes, and blatant ad creep, like the example shown above outside of Pages Books on Queen West, can only fuel the tensions between the two-wheeled camps.

Thanks to Andrew Louis for the tip.  

20 comments

  1. Aaaaah! I hate these ads that take up precious bike lock space. They must be illegal, no?

  2. I can’t figure out what company is responsible for this. The website advertised only has links to a lot of scooter manufacturers.

  3. Here you go:

    Results:
    Registrant:
    tag idea revolution
    275 Renfrew Drive, Suite 200
    Markham, ON L3R 0C8
    CA

    Domain name: SCOOTERISHERE.COM

    Administrative Contact:
    Orlando, Fabio forlando@theautumngroup.ca
    275 Renfrew Drive, Suite 200
    Markham, ON L3R 0C8
    CA
    905.940.1948 Fax: 905.940.4489

  4. I saw these up and down Queen West today, and a LOT outside of OCAD (and one inside its lobby), if that means anything.

  5. Scooterishere.com seems to be some pseudo-hip campaign for an as-of-yet not launched thing. Possibly a nightclub?

  6. Hmm, more investigation reveals that the domains is owned by theautumngroup.ca which is also tag idea revolution which is also idearevoluntion.ca

    http://www.easywhois.com/?domain=scooterishere.com

    searching for “idea revolution agency” yielded me this bio of the company:
    “tag idea revolution is a full-service, integrated communications agency whose sole purpose is to generate ideas that move brands forward. We have one clear, bold objective – to generate outstanding ideas for our clients and have the courage to execute them.”

    http://www.simplyhired.ca/job-id/t2qae6bfjf/intermediate-interactive-jobs/

    They seem to be fairly new or recently changed their name, as the only hits I get for “tag idea revolution” lead to job ads.

  7. A whois search gives info on the person who registered that domain name http://www.whois.net/whois/scooterishere.com

    No way to know that the domain name was registered by the same person who thought it was cool to take up bike parking space with an ad for scooters though. So I wouldn’t organise a pitchfork mob just yet – but I have sent a polite email to the registrant.

  8. scooterishere.com is registered to The Autumn Group, a Markham-based marketing firm. Their site lists Honda as a client, but doesn’t mention the other scooter manufacturers.

  9. I wonder if it would be considered ad theft if we clipped the zip ties, or whether these ads are considered abandoned property for their method of fastening.

    Either way, I’m bringing my park tools on my next ride.

  10. Perhaps it is just scooter advocacy, not actually a business.

    Very strange.

  11. I’d like the city to fine them, the ugly ads are illegal aren’t they?

  12. I have no problems with e-scooters though, I think they’re cool.

  13. If someone put a fake car in a car parking space, I wonder how many seconds it would take for it to be removed. I’ve no problem with e-scooters either, but this kind of shit is unacceptable. First it’s Vespa “graffiti”, now it’s this.

  14. “I wonder if it would be considered ad theft if we clipped the zip ties, or whether these ads are considered abandoned property for their method of fastening.”

    I believe the situation is a lot simpler. If someone posters in public property, anyone has the right to remove said posters. (Why wouldn’t they? There are no firm postering regulations) I frequently remove those board posters you see nailed or fastened with zip ties to poles.

    And like the junk removal and $99 car alarm signs, these will end up (hopefully) in garbage containers. Hopefully quickly, so that this contribution to ad creep can prove to be a total waste money for its installers.

  15. …they sure didn’t last long here though. I saw them all over the Latin Quarter one day, and all gone the next. Perhaps they got their hands slapped more quickly in MTL?

  16. I tore some off on the weekend. They are just cardboard. If you have a bit more time call the City’s bike parking people. They can confiscate anything attached to the post and rings. The companies have to pay to get their property back. Perhaps they could be fined but I’m not sure how.

  17. I know it’s not the point, but just take them off the bike poles yourselves… they’re made of cardboard and held on with zip ties, there’s no need to ask if you should have the city remove them, it’s a waste of your time and frankly makes you look like an imbecile. The city won’t fine these people at all, just throw their junk in the recycling bins nearby. The posts are for bikes.

  18. as a late addition side note to chephy, “First it’s Vespa “graffiti”, now it’s this.”
    the vespa ads were in quite harmless places, giving a great visual interest to our grossly blank city. please take a moment to think about the artist behind it. I get great pleasure on my travels, finding a bright new burner thrown up overnight on a previously shabby alley wall. these artists paint our city beautiful and I for one will not fault them getting paid. check out his other work and take a moment to reflect on that comment.

    http://www.acityrenewalproject.com/a_city_renewal_project_press_release.pdf
    http://www.fauxreel.ca/#

Comments are closed.