PODCAST: City scenes that saved summer

It’s been a rough summer for everyone, but people have found ways to get outside and make the most of it. In this episode, we... Read More

REID: Remembering Doug Taylor, a historian of Toronto

Doug Taylor, one of Toronto’s local historians, died recently at the age of 82. I got to know Doug because we were both among the... Read More

The Dufferin Grove Stones and the surprisingly winding trail to discover the origins of mysterious Toronto architectural ruins

Hidden amongst the shrubs of one of Toronto’s best-loved parks lies a collection of architectural ruins – carved stones – recently... Read More

Apology, Truth, and Reparations: The overdue reckoning with Canada’s slave past

This essay is a sequel to Natasha Henry’s account of the history of enslavement of Black people in Canada prior to 1834, published in... Read More

The connections between public art and activism

In this moment of social and political upheaval, as protesters demand racial justice in response to police brutality and systemic... Read More

SPACING’S NEW BOOK: Remnants of Mid-Century Toronto

WHAT: Remnants of Mid-Century Toronto, photos by Vik Pahwa, edited by Matthew Blackett COST: $25 / use midcenturylove during checkout... Read More

LORINC: What’s in a street name? Dundas and other uncomfortable truths about our city

The street where I live, near St. Clair West and Christie, was originally called Victoria after it was carved out of a farmer’s field... Read More

If Black lives truly matter in Canada, an apology for slavery is only a first step

silNatasha Henry is a 2018 Vanier Scholar completing a PhD in History at York University on the enslavement of Africans in early... Read More

Tales from The Concert Hall at the Masonic Temple

“You need to get there by 5. Or 4, if you can.” This advice might have come from someone’s older brother, or more likely someone’s... Read More