Monday’s headlines

CITY HALL
• Hume: Toronto embarked on a civic, if not a civil, war[The Star]
• How Rob Ford is politically energizing Toronto [National Post]
• Should writers run for office, or is the pen still mightier? [Globe & Mail]
• The team that keeps the hordes from Ford’s door [Globe & Mail]
• City Hall Diary: A final plea to end partisan bickering, unify city [The Star]
• City improperly approved millions in sole-source purchases [The Star]
• Kelly McPharland: Toronto gets a choice between gravy or taxes [National Post]
• On the street with a councillor: One man’s gravy is another’s essentials [National Post]
• Female councillors told me ‘you’re a bitch’: Nunziata [National Post]
• How Rob Ford could improve T.O. [The Sun]

FOOD ON THE STREET
• More than just meat on a stick at Taste of the Danforth [The Star]
• Street festivals are the tasting menus of Toronto [National Post]
• Portland’s street food vendors have carte blanche – almost [The Star]

MISSISSAUGA
• Mississauga by-election turns into pitched battle [Globe & Mail]
• Power plant sparks outrage [The Sun]

OTHER NEWS
• Original farmhouses still grace now-busy city streets [The Star]
• A French Quarter in Toronto? Mais oui! [National Post]
• What does it feel like to be a tourist in Toronto? [The Star]

One comment

  1. I think the problem with being a tourist in Toronto is how spread out everything is. We have various ethnic enclaves which are spread out across downtown and beyond. We have some glorious waterfront west and east of downtown, but they are somewhat inaccessible via public transportation. The ROM and Ontario Science Centre are several miles apart. Then we have places like Canada’s Wonderland, Dave and Busters, and Playdium which have very limited accessibility from the inner city.

    When I was in Montreal, I was impressed with how accessible most things were from my downtown hotel room. Parks, historic districts, museums, and more were all close together in and around downtown, and linked with rapid transit. Even La Ronde, their equivalent of Canada’s Wonderland, was on the metro and only a couple of miles away from downtown.

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