The “great monster of death” arrives in Toronto

Lenton Williams worked in the printing department at Eaton’s department store. On the evening of June 14, 1905, the 60-year-old was... Read More

When Haileybury burned, Toronto sent streetcars

The town of Haileybury sits on the shore of Lake Timiskaming, a serpentine body of water on the northern reaches of the Ottawa River... Read More

The curious origin of the original low-floor streetcar

Toronto is in the (unexpectedly slow) process of getting new low-floor streetcars. The goal of these new cars is accessibility —... Read More

Toronto’s Depression-era beauty queen baseball star

Women have been playing baseball for as long as anyone can remember. And for much of that time, they’ve been playing despite the... Read More

The half-built relics of nixed Toronto skyscrapers

In 1914, John Eaton, the third son of retail magnate Timothy Eaton, began preparing plans for a massive expansion of his... Read More

Fife and Drum: The day the fort was saved from streetcars

The latest edition of Fife and Drum, the quarterly newsletter produced by the Friends of Fort York, was recently released. As always... Read More

A history of developers and holdouts in Toronto

When the Imperial Oil company began assembling land for its new executive offices on St. Clair Ave. W. in 1952, it didn’t reckon... Read More

How Exhibition Place got the retro Dufferin Gate

You can tell a lot about a place by how it greets its visitors. The goofy lights at Honest Ed’s tell customers... Read More

The creation of Toronto’s first City Hall and market buildings

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece was written in 1985 by Stephen Otto for a catalog that was never published to accompany the exhibit... Read More

The modernist Bloor-Danforth line at 50

The Bloor-Danforth line turned 50 today. Five decades ago, on February 25, 1966, the first section of Toronto’s first east-west... Read More